Dr Dorine Rouiller

Academic Visitor

Research

 

I work on Early modern literature and intellectual history, considering especially French but also Latin, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, German and English texts. I defended in June 2018 my doctoral thesis about climate theories in the Renaissance, in which I examine how antique theories of the climatic influence on human being were borrowed and reconsidered by Renaissance authors of travel narratives, philosophical, medical, cosmographical and fictional writings in the context of the Great Discoveries.

My new project is about cosmopolitanism in the same period. Starting with Erasmus’ Christian universalism and ending with the provoking cosmopolitan declarations of  libertins such as François de la Mothe Le Vayer or Théophile de Viau in the first seventeenth century, going through Montaigne’s, Pierre Charron’s, Jean Bodin’s and many others’ cosmopolitan conceptions and convictions, my work aims to trace the history of the idea of cosmopolitanism in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, based on close reading of the texts which embody it.

 

 

Publications

 

« L’Apothéose de l’ethnographe : Tristes tropiques ou le voyage vers soi », Asdiwal, Revue genevoise d’anthropologie et d’histoire des religions, 7 (2012), p. 99-117.

 

« Le caméléon et le hérisson : Cosmopolitisme et élargissement des horizons géographiques à la Renaissance (Montaigne, Charron) », Bibliothèque d’Humanisme et Renaissance, LXXVII (2015), n° 3, p. 559-572.

 

« Fantaisies montaigniennes dans la Première journée de Théophile de Viau », Littérature, n°181 (2016), p. 54-70 (https://www.cairn.info/revue-litterature-2016-1-page-54.htm).

 

« L’atelier du cosmographe », Asdiwal, Revue genevoise d’anthropologie et d’histoire des religions, n°11 (2016), p. 160-162.

 

« Théories des climats et cosmopolitisme dans la Sagesse de Pierre Charron », Modern Language Notes, numéro spécial « Climates Past and Present: Perspectives from Early Modern France », vol. 132, n°4 (September 2017, French Issue), p. 912-930.

Subscribe to Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages