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Oliver Ready is a literary scholar and translator specializing in Russian prose of the late- and post-Soviet periods, and in nineteenth-century literature, especially Gogol and Dostoevsky.

Before beginning graduate study he spent time in Saransk, Moscow and Gdańsk, working as a teacher and journalist. After completing his doctorate at Wolfson College (Oxford), Dr Ready stayed on there as a Junior Research Fellow, before moving to St Antony’s College, where he convened various seminar series and conferences, including one ‘Translators’ Coven’.  Between 2014 and 2020 he held several Departmental and Stipendiary Lectureships, teaching at various Oxford colleges. He now teaches part-time at St Edmund Hall and works freelance as a literary translator. He has received prizes for his translations of Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, Yuri Buida’s story-cycle The Prussian Bride, and Vladimir Sharov’s novels Before & During and The Rehearsals.

He was Consultant Editor for Russia and East-Central Europe at the Times Literary Supplement  from 2008 to 2017.

Research

He is working on a study of Nikolai Gogol for the Critical Lives series published by Reaktion Books, and, as translator and scholar, on the novels and essays of Vladimir Sharov (1952-2018).

Selected Publications

Persisting in Folly: Russian writers in search of wisdom, 1963-2013 (Peter Lang, 2017)

‘Aleksei Slapovskii and the Art of Adapting’, Modern Language Review, vol. 105, no. 4 (2010), pp. 1105-29

‘In Praise of Booze: Moskva-Petushki and Erasmian Irony’, Slavonic and East European Review, vol. 88, no. 3 (2010), pp. 437-67

A new translation of Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, with introduction and full critical apparatus (Penguin, 2014)

A new translation of Gogol's 'Essential Stories': And the Earth Will Sit on the Moon (Pushkin Press, 2019)

As translator,  the novels Before & During (2014),  The Rehearsals (2018) and Be as Children (2021) by Vladimir Sharov 

As co-translator, The Maisky Diaries in three volumes, edited by Gabriel Gorodetsky (Yale, 2017)