Peter Budrin

DPhil Candidate, Clarendon Scholar
B.A. (Hons) in Journalism, Moscow State University
M.A. in Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto

Research

My DPhil project examines the reception of Laurence Sterne, the author of Tristrsam Shandy and A Sentimental Journey, in the Soviet Russian culture of the 1920s and 1930s. In my thesis, I demonstrate how Sterne – both as a literary personality, and as an experimental prose writer – was received, translated and gained admirers among readers and writers living in the restrictive and increasingly totalitarian society of post-revolutionary Russia. At its heart, this is a study of how people, suffering from the unfreedom imposed by the state, find their escape in complex, whimsical, and atemporal worlds of comic fiction.

Together with my colleague Pany Xenophontos, I am an organising member of a collaborative project between the University of Oxford and the University of Genoa which looks at the relationship between literature and film. Our first international conference, The Literary Image and The Screen, took place in September 2019 in Genoa. 
 

Teaching

  • Derzhavin’s Felitsa and the European Enlightenment (Hilary 2019)
  • Russian and Soviet Modernism, 1900-1945: Prose (Hilary 2019)
  • 19th- and 20th-century Russian poetry for Russian Ab Initio (Hilary 2018)
  • Advanced Writing (Russian), University of Toronto, Slavic Languages and Literatures, 2016
Publications
  • ‘The Shadow of Eliza: Sterne’s Underplot in A Sentimental Journey’, in Sterne’s Sentimental Journey: A Legacy to the World, ed. by M.-C. Newbould and W.B. Gerrard (Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, forthcoming 2019).

  • The First Russian Illustrator of Sterne: Nikolai Feofilaktov’s Unpublished Illustrations to A Sentimental Journey, The Shandean: An Annual Volume Devoted to Laurence Sterne and His Works, 30, (2019).

  • ‘Jiří Šalamoun’s Tristram Shandy’, The Shandean: An Annual Volume Devoted to Laurence Sterne and His Works, 29, (2018). 

  • ‘The Enlightenment Mocking Its Own Limitations: Laurence Sterne and 1930s Marxist Philosopher, Russkaya filologiya, vol. 27 (Tartu University Press, 2016), 219-229.

  • ‘A Sentimental Journey in Soviet Translations’, in Tekstologiya i istoriko-literaturnyi protsess, vol. 4 (Moscow State University, 2016), 141-158.

  • “A capful of wind”: Laurence Sterne in Soviet criticism of the 1930s: Sergei Bobrov and Evgenii Lann’’,  Letnyaya shkola po russkoi literature, vol.11, 3 (2016), 275–291.

  • The Rehabilitation of Sterne: Laurence Sterne in Moscow and Leningrad (1932-1941), in Russkaya filologiya. vol. 26, Tartu University Press (2015), 171-182.

  • Laurence Sterne and Russian Intellectuals of the Late Eighteenth Century: Ivan Martynov’s Philosophy of Simplicity, Studia Slavica XIII, (Tallinn University Press, 2015), 11-26. 

  • ‘Pushkin Reads Sterne’, The Shandean: An Annual Volume Devoted to Laurence Sterne and His Works, 23 (2013), 93-103.   

Memberships
  • International Laurence Sterne Foundation (ILSF)
  • British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (BSECS)  
  • Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (CSECS)
  • British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies (BASEES)
  • Anglo-Russian Research Network (ARRN)
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