Cervantes and Shakespeare: 400 years

AN ANGLO-SPANISH SYMPOSIUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

TO COMMEMORATE THEIR DEATHS IN 1616

Thursday 28th to Friday 29th January 2016
Weston Library & Exeter College

All papers will be delivered in English

The event is free and open to all but please register here:

sandra.beaumont@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk

Organized by:
Faculty of Modern Languages, University of Oxford; Office for Cultural and Scientific Affairs, Embassy of Spain; Instituto Cervantes London

CERVANTES AND SHAKESPEARE: 400 YEARS

AN ANGLO-SPANISH SYMPOSIUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

28th — 29th January 2016

Cervantes and Shakespeare, who died within eleven days of each other in 1616, are universally regarded as the supreme exemplars of literary achievement in their respective languages. This symposium brings together six British scholars of Cervantes and six Spanish Shakespeare scholars to explore the literary worlds of these two iconic authors, whose works convey the turbulent spirit of the restless age in which they lived.

Speakers will cover a broad range of topics, such as the ‘lost’ play by Shakespeare, inspired by a story from Cervantes’s Don Quixote; the extraordinary influence of Don Quixote; similarities and differences in form, style, and theme in their works; issues of interpretation; and the enduring fascination both writers have exerted on readers, writers and artists in modern times. All papers will be delivered in English, and there will be plenty of scope for discussion by speakers and audience.

Speakers:

  • Michael Bell (Warwick)
  • Clara Calvo (Murcia)
  • Trevor Dadson (Queen Mary, London)
  • Jonathan Thacker (Oxford)
  • Barry Ife (King’s College London)
  • Zenón Luis-Martínez (Huelva)
  • Jeremy Robbins (Edinburgh)
  • Salvador Oliva (Gerona)
  • Isabel Torres (Queen’s, Belfast)
  • Ángel-Luis Pujante (Murcia)
  • Edwin Williamson (Oxford)
  • Jesús Tronch (Valencia)

Keynote speaker:
Brean Hammond (Nottingham)

Click here for biographical notes on the speakers

PROGRAMME

Thursday, 28th January 2016

WESTON LIBRARY — Inaugural Session

9.30 Opening Remarks

H.E. Federico Trillo-Figueroa, Ambassador of Spain; The Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford

10.00 — 11.15 Keynote lecture

Brean Hammond (Professor of English Literature, University of Nottingham):
Cervantes’s Bones: Or What We Can Learn From Shakespeare’s ‘Lost Play’

First session

11.40 — 12.20: Ángel-Luis Pujante: The Link Cervantes-Shakespeare: Some Spanish Observations

12.20 — 13.00: Edwin Williamson: The Influence and Power of ‘Don Quixote‘

EXETER COLLEGE

Second session

14-30 — 15.10 Trevor J. Dadson: The Multicultural World of Don Quixote

15.10 — 15.50 Michael Bell: The ‘Exploded Psyche’ in Cervantes, Shakespeare and Dickens

Third session

16.10 – 16.50 Zenón Luis-Martínez: ‘Limbs are his Instruments’: The Logic of Division in ‘Troilus and Cressida‘

16. 50 – 17.30 Salvador Oliva: The Problem of Evil in Studies of ‘Macbeth‘

17.30 – 18.45 RECEPTION– EXETER COLLEGE (for audience and speakers)

Friday, 29th January 2016

EXETER COLLEGE

Fourth session 9.30 – 10.10: Jesús Tronch: Imagined Manuscripts in Shakespeare and Cervantes: Behind the Editorial Practice of their Plays

10.10 – 10.50: Barry Ife: Plays, Texts and the Novel as Drama

Fifth session

11.05 – 11.45: Isabel Torres: Poet Come Lately? The Poetics and Politics of Irony in Cervantes’s ‘Viaje del Parnaso‘

11.45 – 12.25: Jeremy Robbins: Journeys and Destinations in Cervantes’s ‘Persiles y Sigismunda‘

Sixth session

15.30 – 16.10: Jonathan Thacker: Translations of Don Quixote in Seventeenth-Century England

16.10 – 16.50: Clara Calvo: Curating Shakespeare

Concluding session

17.00 — 17.30: General discussion and summing-up

Closing Remarks: Ilmo. Sr. D. J.M. Lasalle, Spanish Secretary of State for Culture; Professor Sir Rick Trainor, Rector of Exeter College.

Click here for biographical notes on the speakers

 

The event is free and open to all but please register here:

sandra.beaumont@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk

 


 

 


 

 

   

 

Subscribe to Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages