Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages
Undergraduate Studies
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POSTGRADUATE STUDIES IN MODERN GREEK

Events

MODERN GREEK SEMINAR

CAVAVY WEEK 2013

Greece in Translation Conference

Introduction

Undergraduate courses are offered in Greek language and literature from the foundation of Constantinople (AD 330) to the present day.

Oxford University is one of four universities in Britain where Medieval and Modern Greek can be studied as a major component of a B.A. degree and at graduate level.

Graduate courses in Medieval and Modern Greek literature include taught Master's courses and research degrees (M.Litt. and D.Phil.).

Of the members of the Sub-Faculty of Byzantine and Modern Greek, Professor Lauxtermann teaches Modern and Byzantine Greek literature, Dr. Papanikolaou teaches Modern Greek literature and culture and Mr Skordyles teaches Modern Greek language and history.

The Sub-Faculty has three other members who contribute to teaching and research in Modern Greek studies. The members of the Sub-Faculty have a long list of publications in their respective fields, and they frequently participate in international conferences.

 

Modern Greek in the Preliminary examination for Modern Languages

(and in joint Preliminary Examinations with Modern Languages) (exam after three terms)

MODERN GREEK IN THE PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION FOR MODERN LANGUAGES (and in joint Preliminary Examinations with Modern Languages) (exam after three terms)

Modern Greek may be taken in the Preliminary Examination (which takes place at the end of the third term) in combination with any one of the following: French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Latin, Ancient Greek, Linguistics, Philosophy, English, Modern History, or a Middle Eastern language (Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, or Turkish).

You study four examination subjects in Modern Greek:

I Unprepared translation into Modern Greek and written language exercises in Greek
II Unprepared translation from Modern Greek and written comprehension test
III War, society and culture in twentieth-century Greece
IV Twentieth-century Greek poetry and prose

 

Medieval and Modern Greek in the Final Honour School of Modern Languages

(exam after three or four years, depending on whether or not you take the year abroad: see below)

Medieval and Modern Greek may be taken in the final examinations in Modern Languages, either alone or in combination with French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, or Russian.

The regulations for these examinations are complex, and full details are to be found in the current Examinations Decrees and Regulations published by the University and in the Sub-Faculty Handbook. What follows represents an attempt to provide a full but brief summary.

There is a wide range of examination subjects in Medieval and Modern Greek to choose from:

I Unprepared translation into Modern Greek
II Unprepared translation from Medieval and Modern Greek
III Essay in Modern Greek
IV Linguistic Studies I; one of the following:

(1) History of the Medieval Greek language to A.D. 959
(2) The Colloquial koine of the twelfth to fifteenth centuries
(3) The dialects of Modern Greece

V Linguistic Studies II; one of the following:

(1) The structure of the standard language as spoken and written at the present day.
(2) The Language Controversy

VI Period of literature (1): Byzantine (learned) Greek to 1453

VII Period of literature (2): Medieval (popular) Greek to 1669

VIII Period of literature (3): Modern Greek, 1821 to the present

IX Early (Byzantine & medieval) texts prescribed for study as examples of literature

X Any two of the following:

(1) The epic of Digenis Akritis
(2) The late Byzantine popular verse romances
(3) Cretan drama, with a special study of Chortatsis
(4) Erotokritos
(5) Greek oral poetry (folk song)

XI Modern Prescribed authors: any two of the following:

(1) Solomos
(2) Kavafis
(3) Seferis
(4) Tsirkas
(5) Kazantzakis

XII Special subjects: any one of the following:

(1) The Greek Enlightenment
(2) The School of the Ionian Islands, 1797-1912
(3) Advanced Translation, Theory and Practice
(4) The Greek novel, 1918-1940
(5) Greek women writers
(5) Greek cinema

If you are studying two modern languages, which most students do, you will take a total of ten papers in your two languages. In addition, you may write an optional Extended Essay on an approved topic of your choice, as long as this falls within the scope of the Honour School of Modern Languages.

Joint Schools

Medieval and Modern Greek may also be taken in combination with one of the following: Classics, English, Modern History, Philosophy, or Middle Eastern languages. The regulations for the joint schools are various. No attempt will be given here to give full details.

With Classics: You have a choice whether to take Classics or Medieval and Modern Greek as your first (i.e. main) subject.

A. With Classics as first subject (which presupposes that you have taken Classical Moderations rather than the Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages), both Latin and Ancient Greek are studied.
B. With Medieval and Modern Greek as first subject, either Latin or Ancient Greek is studied.

In A, candidates take four papers in Medieval and Modern Greek, in B six (out of a total of ten, with the optional addition of an Extended Essay).

With English: You may take four or five papers in Medieval and Modern Greek (out of a total of eight or nine).

With Modern History: You may take four papers in Medieval and Modern Greek out of a total of nine.

With Philosophy: You may take between five and seven papers in Medieval and Modern Greek.

With a Middle Eastern language: You may take Modern Greek in combination with one of the following languages: Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, or Turkish.

Oral Examination

The oral examination is compulsory in the final examinations in Medieval and Modern Greek.

The Year Abroad

A year abroad (during the penultimate year) is normally compulsory for candidates reading Modern Languages; this brings the length of the course to a total of four years (five years for those who take Classics Moderations).

Further information is available from Dr Papanikolaou, Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages, Taylor Institution, St. Giles', Oxford OX1 3NA, UK. (dimitris.papanikolaou@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk).

 

Related websites

Modern Greek resources at the Taylor Institution

Greek Language Portal

Greek Language Centre

Filoglossia (online Greek course)

National Book Centre of Greece

Late Antique and Byzantine web site