Launch of a new Modern Languages 1+1 MBA programme

The Faculty are delighted to announce the launch of a new configuration of our MSt course through a partnership with the Saïd Business School.

 

The new 1+1 MBA course with Modern Languages will be available for first intake from October 2019 —  available across all Languages offered by the Faculty: French, German, Spanish, Russian, Italian, Portuguese and Greek.  The course is a unique, two-year graduate experience that combines the depth of a specialised, master’s degree with the breadth of a top-ranking, one-year MBA.  Students follow the standard MSt Modern Languages programme in year one, with a bridging programme over the Summer vacation, and then follow the MBA course in their second year.  As part of the 1+1 cohort, the students have access to a range of business-related support and resources throughout the first year of their course (including access to specialist careers advice, corporate events and business networks).

 

A recent longitudinal study identified Oxford language graduate salaries were above that of STEM and a recent report by the Confederation of Business and Industry (CBI) stated business was calling out for skilled professionals with languages.  The pairing of an MBA with the MSt Modern Languages allows candidates to develop business skills alongside an enhanced understanding of the culture(s) associated with a specific foreign language. The combination of language and business skills will provide useful tools for those wishing to pursue a career in many international environments, whether these be commercial, educational, or the third sector.

 

The Saïd Business School have run the 1+1 course with a number of other University departments including Japanese Studies, Latin America Studies, Music, and Visual, Material & Museum Anthropology, but this is the first time that the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages has been involved. 

  

The Chair of the Faculty Board, Professor Ian Watson says “We are excited to launch this new programme, and are looking forward to working closely with the Business School.  This represents a really interesting development in our graduate course offering, combining the Faculty’s focus on non-Anglophone literatures and cultures with core business skills.”

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